Download Women S Diaries As Narrative In The Nineteenth Century Novel Pdf, Women S Diaries As Narrative In The Nineteenth Century Novel epub, Women S Diaries As Narrative In The Nineteenth Century Novel free, Women S Diaries As Narrative In The Nineteenth Century Novel author, Women S Diaries As Narrative In The Nineteenth Century Novel audiobook, Women S Diaries As Narrative In The Nineteenth Century Novel free epub, telecharger Women S Diaries As Narrative In The Nineteenth Century Novel

Women's Diaries as Narrative in the Nineteenth-Century Novel

Pdf Women's Diaries as Narrative in the Nineteenth-Century Novel
Genre Literary Criticism
Author Catherine Delafield
Isbn 1317201345
File size 399 kb
Year 2016-07-22
Pages 198
Language English
File format PDF

Download the Book

Summary

First published in 2009, this book investigates the cultural significance of nineteenth-century women’s writing and reading practices. Beginning with an examination of non-fictional diaries and the practice of diary writing, it assesses the interaction between the fictional diary and other forms of literary production such as epistolary narrative, the periodical, the factual document and sensation fiction. The discrepancies between the private diary and its use as a narrative device are explored through the writings of Frances Burney, Elizabeth Gaskell, Anne Brontë, Dinah Craik, Wilkie Collins and Bram Stoker. It also considers women as writers, readers and subjects and demonstrates ways in which women could become performers of their own story through a narrative method which was authorized by their femininity and at the same time allowed them to challenge the myth of domestic womanhood. This book will be of interest to those studying 19th century literature and women in literature.

Time, Space, and Gender in the Nineteenth-Century British Diary

Pdf Time, Space, and Gender in the Nineteenth-Century British Diary
Genre Literary Criticism
Author R. Steinitz
Isbn 0230339603
File size 916 kb
Year 2011-10-24
Pages 272
Language English
File format PDF

Download the Book

Summary

Through close examinations of diaries, diary publication, and diaries in fiction, this book explores how the diary's construction of time and space made it an invaluable and effective vehicle for the dominant discourses of the period; it also explains how the genre evolved into the feminine, emotive, private form we continue to privilege today.

Epistolary Encounters in Neo-Victorian Fiction

Pdf Epistolary Encounters in Neo-Victorian Fiction
Genre Literary Criticism
Author K. Brindle
Isbn 1137007168
File size 750 kb
Year 2014-01-24
Pages 224
Language English
File format PDF

Download the Book

Summary

Neo-Victorian writers invoke conflicting viewpoints in diaries, letters, etc. to creatively retrace the past in fragmentary and contradictory ways. This book explores the complex desires involved in epistolary discoveries of 'hidden' Victorians, offering new insight into the creative synthesising of critical thought within the neo-Victorian novel.

The History of British Women's Writing, 1830-1880

Pdf The History of British Women's Writing, 1830-1880
Genre Literary Criticism
Author Lucy Hartley
Isbn 1137584653
File size 842 kb
Year 2018-09-22
Pages 349
Language English
File format PDF

Download the Book

Summary

This volume charts the rise of professional women writers across diverse fields of intellectual enquiry and through different modes of writing in the period immediately before and during the reign of Queen Victoria. It demonstrates how, between 1830 and 1880, the woman writer became an agent of cultural formation and contestation, appealing to and enabling the growth of female readership while issuing a challenge to the authority of male writers and critics. Of especial importance were changing definitions of marriage, family and nation, of class, and of morality as well as new conceptions of sexuality and gender, and of sympathy and sensation. The result is a richly textured account of a radical and complex process of feminization whereby formal innovations in the different modes of writing by women became central to the aesthetic, social, and political formation of British culture and society in the nineteenth century.

British Women's Life Writing, 1760-1840

Pdf British Women's Life Writing, 1760-1840
Genre Literary Criticism
Author A. Culley
Isbn 1137274220
File size 347 kb
Year 2014-07-22
Pages 270
Language English
File format PDF

Download the Book

Summary

British Women's Life Writing, 1760-1840 brings together for the first time a wide range of print and manuscript sources to demonstrate women's innovative approach to self-representation. It examines canonical writers, such as Mary Wollstonecraft, Mary Robinson, and Helen Maria Williams, amongst others.

Women’s Letters as Life Writing 1840–1885

Pdf Women’s Letters as Life Writing 1840–1885
Genre Literary Criticism
Author Catherine Delafield
Isbn 100002511X
File size 1938 kb
Year 2019-12-20
Pages 248
Language English
File format PDF

Download the Book

Summary

Examining letter collections published in the second half of the nineteenth century, Catherine Delafield rereads the life-writing of Frances Burney, Charlotte Brontë, Mary Delany, Catherine Winkworth, Jane Austen and George Eliot, situating these women in their epistolary culture and in relation to one another as exemplary women of the period. She traces the role of their editors in the publishing process and considers how a model of representation in letters emerged from the publication of Burney’s Diary and Letters and Elizabeth Gaskell’s Life of Brontë. Delafield contends that new correspondences emerge between editors/biographers and their biographical subjects, and that the original epistolary pact was remade in collaboration with family memorials in private and with reviewers in public. Women’s Letters as Life Writing addresses issues of survival and choice when an archive passes into family hands, tracing the means by which women’s lives came to be written and rewritten in letters in the nineteenth century.

Serialization and the Novel in Mid-Victorian Magazines

Pdf Serialization and the Novel in Mid-Victorian Magazines
Genre Literary Criticism
Author Catherine Delafield
Isbn 1317057007
File size 1545 kb
Year 2016-03-03
Pages 222
Language English
File format PDF

Download the Book

Summary

Examining the Victorian serial as a text in its own right, Catherine Delafield re-reads five novels by Elizabeth Gaskell, Anthony Trollope, Dinah Craik and Wilkie Collins by situating them in the context of periodical publication. She traces the roles of the author and editor in the creation and dissemination of the texts and considers how first publication affected the consumption and reception of the novel through the periodical medium. Delafield contends that a novel in volume form has been separated from its original context, that is, from the pattern of consumption and reception presented by the serial. The novel's later re-publication still bears the imprint of this serialized original, and this book’s investigation into nineteenth-century periodicals both generates new readings of the texts and reinstates those which have been lost in the reprinting process. Delafield's case studies provide evidence of the ways in which Household Words, Cornhill Magazine, Good Words, All the Year Round and Cassell's Magazine were designed for new audiences of novel readers. Serialization and the Novel in Mid-Victorian Magazines addresses the material conditions of production, illustrates the collective and collaborative creation of the serialized novel, and contextualizes a range of texts in the nineteenth-century experience of print.

Gender and Conversion Narratives in the Nineteenth Century

Pdf Gender and Conversion Narratives in the Nineteenth Century
Genre History
Author Kirsten Rüther,Angelika Schaser
Isbn 1317130758
File size 475 kb
Year 2016-03-03
Pages 212
Language English
File format PDF

Download the Book

Summary

Addressing an important social and political issue which is still much debated today, this volume explores the connections between religious conversions and gendered identity against the backdrop of a world undergoing significant social transformations. Adopting a collaborative approach to their research, the authors explore the connections and differences in conversion experiences, tracing the local and regional rootedness of individual conversions as reflected in conversion narratives in three different locations: Germany and German missions in South Africa and colonial Australia, at a time of massive social changes in the 1860s. Beginning with the representation of religious experiences in so-called conversion narratives, the authors explore the social embeddedness of religious conversions and inquire how people related to their social surroundings, and in particular to gender order and gender practices, before, during and after their conversion. With a concluding reflective essay on comparative methods of history writing and transnational perspectives on conversion, this book offers a fresh perspective on historical debates about religious change, gender and social relations.

Adaptation in Young Adult Novels

Pdf Adaptation in Young Adult Novels
Genre Literary Criticism
Author Dana E. Lawrence,Amy L. Montz
Isbn 1501361783
File size 1566 kb
Year 2020-09-03
Pages 256
Language English
File format PDF

Download the Book

Summary

Adaptation in Young Adult Novels argues that adapting classic and canonical literature and historical places engages young adult readers with their cultural past and encourages them to see how that past can be rewritten. The textual afterlives of classic texts raise questions for new readers: What can be changed? What benefits from change? How can you, too, be agents of change? The contributors to this volume draw on a wide range of contemporary novels – from Rick Riordan's Percy Jackson series and Megan Shepherd's Madman's Daughter trilogy to Jesmyn Ward's Salvage the Bones – adapted from mythology, fairy tales, historical places, and the literary classics of Shakespeare, Charles Dickens, Jane Austen, and F. Scott Fitzgerald, among others. Unpacking the new perspectives and critiques of gender, sexuality, and the cultural values of adolescents inherent to each adaptation, the essays in this volume make the case that literary adaptations are just as valuable as original works and demonstrate how the texts studied empower young readers to become more culturally, historically, and socially aware through the lens of literary diversity.

Nineteenth-Century Southern Women Writers

Pdf Nineteenth-Century Southern Women Writers
Genre Literary Criticism
Author Melissa Walker Heidari,Brigitte Zaugg
Isbn 1000586944
File size 753 kb
Year 2019-08-12
Pages 200
Language English
File format PDF

Download the Book

Summary

The essays in this book explore the role of Grace King’s fiction in the movement of American literature from local color and realism to modernism and show that her work exposes a postbellum New Orleans that is fragmented socially, politically, and linguistically. In her introduction, Melissa Walker Heidari examines selections from King’s journals and letters as views into her journey toward a modernist aesthetic—what King describes in one passage as "the continual voyage I made." Sirpa Salenius sees King’s fiction as a challenge to dominant conceptualizations of womanhood and a reaction against female oppression and heteronormativity. In his analysis of "An Affair of the Heart," Ralph J. Poole highlights the rhetoric of excess that reveals a social satire debunking sexual and racial double standards. Ineke Bockting shows the modernist aspects of King’s fiction through a stylistic analysis which explores spatial, temporal, biological, psychological, social, and racial liminalities. Françoise Buisson demonstrates that King’s writing "is inspired by the Southern oral tradition but goes beyond it by taking on a theatrical dimension that can be quite modern and even experimental at times." Kathie Birat claims that it is important to underline King’s relationship to realism, "for the metonymic functioning of space as a signifier for social relations is an important characteristic of the realist novel." Stéphanie Durrans analyzes "The Story of a Day" as an incest narrative and focuses on King’s development of a modernist aesthetics to serve her terrifying investigation into social ills as she probes the inner world of her silent character. Amy Doherty Mohr explores intersections between regionalism and modernism in public and silenced histories, as well as King’s treatment of myth and mobility. Brigitte Zaugg examines in "The Little Convent Girl" King’s presentation of the figure of the double and the issue of language as well as the narrative voice, which, she argues, "definitely inscribes the text, with its understatement, economy and quiet symbolism, in the modernist tradition." Miki Pfeffer closes the collection with an afterword in which she offers excerpts from King’s letters as encouragement for "scholars to seek Grace King as a primary source," arguing that "Grace King’s own words seem best able to dialogue with the critical readings herein." Each of these essays enables us to see King’s place in the construction of modernity; each illuminates the "continual voyage" that King made.

Beneath the American Renaissance

Pdf Beneath the American Renaissance
Genre Literary Criticism
Author David S. Reynolds
Isbn 0199976392
File size 1488 kb
Year 2011-06-01
Pages 656
Language English
File format PDF

Download the Book

Summary

The award-winning Beneath the American Renaissance is a classic work on American literature. It immeasurably broadens our knowledge of our most important literary period, as first identified by F.O. Matthiessen's American Renaissance. With its combination of sharp critical insight, engaging observation, and narrative drive, it represents the kind of masterful cultural history for which David Reynolds is known. Here the major works of Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman, Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, and Dickinson receive striking, original readings set against the rich backdrop of contemporary popular writing. Now back in print, the volume includes a new foreword by historian Sean Wilentz that reveals the book's impact and influence. A magisterial work of criticism and cultural history, Beneath the American Renaissance will fascinate anyone interested in the genesis of America's most significant literary epoch and the iconic figures who defined it.

Britain and the Narration of Travel in the Nineteenth Century

Pdf Britain and the Narration of Travel in the Nineteenth Century
Genre Literary Criticism
Author Kate Hill
Isbn 1134794738
File size 752 kb
Year 2017-05-15
Pages 236
Language English
File format PDF

Download the Book

Summary

Interrogating the multiple ways in which travel was narrated and mediated, by and in response to, nineteenth-century British travelers, this interdisciplinary collection examines to what extent these accounts drew on and developed existing tropes of travel. The three sections take up personal and intimate narratives that were not necessarily designed for public consumption, tales intended for a popular audience, and accounts that were more clearly linked with discourses and institutions of power, such as imperial processes of conquest and governance. Some narratives focus on the things the travelers carried, such as souvenirs from the battlefields of Britain’s imperial wars, while others show the complexity of Victorian dreams of the exotic. Still others offer a disapproving glimpse of Victorian mores through the eyes of indigenous peoples in contrast to the imperialist vision of British explorers. Swiss hotel registers, guest books, and guidebooks offer insights into the history of tourism, while new photographic technologies, the development of the telegraph system, and train travel transformed the visual, audial, and even the conjugal experience of travel. The contributors attend to issues of gender and ethnicity in essays on women travelers, South African travel narratives, and accounts of China during the Opium Wars, and analyze the influence of fictional travel narratives. Taken together, these essays show how these multiple narratives circulated, cross-fertilised, and reacted to one another to produce new narratives, new objects, and new modes of travel.

The Fallen Woman in the Nineteenth-Century English Novel

Pdf The Fallen Woman in the Nineteenth-Century English Novel
Genre Literary Criticism
Author George Watt
Isbn 1317200799
File size 1181 kb
Year 2016-07-22
Pages 238
Language English
File format PDF

Download the Book

Summary

A sympathetic view of the fallen women in Victorian England begins in the novel. First published in 1984, this book shows that the fallen woman in the nineteenth-century novel is, amongst other things, a direct response to the new society. Through the examination of Dickens, Gaskell, Collins, Moore, Trollope, Gissing and Hardy, it demonstrates that the fallen woman is the first in a long line of sympathetic creations which clash with many prevailing social attitudes, and especially with the supposedly accepted dichotomy of the ‘two women’. This book will be of interest to students of nineteenth-century literature and women in literature.

The Victorian Novel, Service Work, and the Nineteenth-Century Economy

Pdf The Victorian Novel, Service Work, and the Nineteenth-Century Economy
Genre Business & Economics
Author Joshua Gooch
Isbn 1137525517
File size 1129 kb
Year 2015-08-13
Pages 233
Language English
File format PDF

Download the Book

Summary

This book offers a much-needed study of the Victorian novel's role in representing and shaping the service sector's emergence. Arguing that prior accounts of the novel's relation to the rise of finance have missed the emergence of a wider service sector, it traces the effects of service work's many forms and class positions in the Victorian novel.

The Peripheral Child in Nineteenth Century Literature and its Criticism

Pdf The Peripheral Child in Nineteenth Century Literature and its Criticism
Genre Social Science
Author N. Cocks
Isbn 1137452455
File size 1175 kb
Year 2014-09-18
Pages 215
Language English
File format PDF

Download the Book

Summary

Established accounts of the child in nineteenth century literature tend to focus on those who occupy a central position within narratives. This book is concerned with children who are not so easily recognized or remembered, the peripheral or overlooked children to be read in works by Dickens, Brontë, Austen and Rossetti.

Wilkie Collins (Authors in Context)

Pdf Wilkie Collins (Authors in Context)
Genre Literary Criticism
Author Lyn Pykett
Isbn 9780191517860
File size 303 kb
Year 2005-09-08
Pages 272
Language English
File format PDF

Download the Book

Summary

Wilkie Collins is mainly remembered for his best-selling sensation novel The Woman in White and his detective mystery The Moonstone , both published in the 1860s. However, in a literary career spanning nearly forty years he wrote over twenty novels, several plays, and numerous short stories in which his preoccupations with Victorian society are revealed. Irregular liaisons, the chaotic state of the marriage laws, social and psychological identity, and the interconnections between respectable society and the world of crime are recurring themes in Collins's fiction. Lyn Pykett looks at Collins's long and varied career in relation to the changing circumstances of his own life, a changing literary marketplace, and the changing worlds of nineteenth-century Britain, as well as his enduring legacy for modern writers and interpreters. The book includes a chronology of Collins's life and times, suggestions for further reading, websites, illustrations, and a comprehensive index. ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.

Literature, Gender, and Nation-Building in Nineteenth-Century Egypt

Pdf Literature, Gender, and Nation-Building in Nineteenth-Century Egypt
Genre Religion
Author M. Hatem
Isbn 0230118607
File size 1434 kb
Year 2011-04-11
Pages 234
Language English
File format PDF

Download the Book

Summary

This book examines how the process of nation-building in Egypt helped transform Egypt from an Ottoman province to an Arabic speaking national community. Through the discussion of the life and works of the prominent writer `A'isha Taymur, Hatem gives insight into how literature and the changing gender roles of women and men contributed to the definition and/or development of a sense of community.

Narratives of the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars

Pdf Narratives of the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars
Genre History
Author C. Kennedy
Isbn 1137316535
File size 877 kb
Year 2013-09-19
Pages 263
Language English
File format PDF

Download the Book

Summary

The volume explores how the Revolutionary and Napoleonic wars were experienced, perceived and narrated by contemporaries in Britain and Ireland, drawing on an extensive range of personal testimonies by soldiers, sailors and civilians to shed new light on the social and cultural history of the period and the history of warfare more broadly.

Dress Culture in Late Victorian Women's Fiction

Pdf Dress Culture in Late Victorian Women's Fiction
Genre Literary Criticism
Author Christine Bayles Kortsch
Isbn 1317147995
File size 1977 kb
Year 2016-05-13
Pages 212
Language English
File format PDF

Download the Book

Summary

In her immensely readable and richly documented book, Christine Bayles Kortsch asks us to shift our understanding of late Victorian literary culture by examining its inextricable relationship with the material culture of dress and sewing. Even as the Education Acts of 1870, 1880, and 1891 extended the privilege of print literacy to greater numbers of the populace, stitching samplers continued to be a way of acculturating girls in both print literacy and what Kortsch terms "dress culture." Kortsch explores nineteenth-century women's education, sewing and needlework, mainstream fashion, alternative dress movements, working-class labor in the textile industry, and forms of social activism, showing how dual literacy in dress and print cultures linked women writers with their readers. Focusing on Victorian novels written between 1870 and 1900, Kortsch examines fiction by writers such as Olive Schreiner, Ella Hepworth Dixon, Margaret Oliphant, Sarah Grand, and Gertrude Dix, with attention to influential predecessors like Elizabeth Gaskell, Charlotte Brontë, and George Eliot. Periodicals, with their juxtaposition of journalism, fiction, and articles on dress and sewing are particularly fertile sites for exploring the close linkages between print and dress cultures. Informed by her examinations of costume collections in British and American museums, Kortsch's book broadens our view of New Woman fiction and its relationship both to dress culture and to contemporary women's fiction.

Narrative and Genre

Pdf Narrative and Genre
Genre History
Author Mary Chamberlain, Paul Thompson
Isbn 9781412849159
File size 1981 kb
Year
Pages N.A
Language English
File format PDF

Download the Book

Summary

Any life story, whether a written autobiography or an oral testimony, is shaped not only by the reworkings of experience through memory and re-evaluation, but also by art. Any communication has to use shared conventions not only of language itself, but also the more complex expectations of "genre," the forms expected within a given context and type of communication. This collection of essays by international academics draws on a wide range of disciplines in the social sciences and the humanities to examine how far the expectations and forms of genre shape different kinds of autobiography and influence what messages they can convey. After investigating the problem of genre definition, and tracing the evolution of genre as a concept, contributors explore such issues as: How far can we argue that what people narrate in their autobiographical stories is selected and shaped by the repertoire of genre available to them? To what extent is oral autobiography shaped by its social and cultural context? What is the relationship between autobiographical sources and the ethnographer? Narrative and Genre presents exciting new debates in an emerging field and will encourage international and interdisciplinary discussion. Its authors and contributors are scholars from the fields of anthropology, cultural studies, literary analysis, psychology, psychoanalysis, social history, and sociology. Mary Chamberlain is professor of modern social history at Oxford Brookes University. Paul Thompson is research professor at the University of Essex; senior research fellow, Institute of Community Studies; founder, National Life Story Collection, British Library National Sound Archive.